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Rush of Ase

Ere Ibeji | Ibeji | Ibejí | Ibeyí | Jimaguas | Orisa Twins

Regular price $45.00 USD
Regular price Sale price $45.00 USD
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Ibeji | Twins

Also known as Ibejí, Ibeyí, Jimaguas, or Orisa Twins

These are hand carved Ibeji from Oyo State, Nigeria.

They are approximately 1 ft tall and 3 inches wide.

Comes in black or red and Male or Female

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These carvings are called ere ibeji (‘ere’ means sacred image; ‘ibi’ means born; ‘eji’ means two’ and ibeji, means “born two times” or “twins.” Their heads are oversized because that is where one’s Ori (spiritual self) lives, it is the most important part of the body, it determines the success or failure of us achieving our destiny (full potential). The male wears a crown and the female has her hair up in a bun. They are wearing Ewu ileke (tunic), also known as Ewu Shango to demonstrate their strong connection with Orisa Sango. And the cowries on the tunic represent wealth. They are usually brought in sets of two (Male and Female) or three.

Twin children are regarded as divine blessings which bring happiness to their family and bring double the financial burden. The Ibeji represent the duality of life, as well as discipline, serenity, confidence, stability, wealth, health, protection, keeping of oaths, victory of enemies, and abundance. Born in Odu Baba Oyeku Meji, Iwori Ogbe

An above average number of twins are born on the African continent, compared to other parts of the world. The Yoruba people, who live in southwest Nigeria, have the highest rate of multiple births (dizygotic twins) in the world. Nigeria is often referred to as the capital of twins.

The first of the twins to be born is traditionally named Taiyewo or Tayewo, (which means 'the first to taste the world'); this is often shortened to Taiwo, Taiye, or Taye. Kehinde, "the last to come", is the name of the last-born twin.

The child after the twins is called "Idowu", then "Alaba, " “Oni;” and then “Ola” or "Idogbe."

It is believed that Kehinde, the last-born twin, sends Taiyewo, the first-born twin, to check out what life is like on earth and to tell him/her whether it is good. Thus, it is believed that the last-born twin is actually the true elder of the twins despite being the last to be born because he/she sent the first born on a mission, similar to how an elder would.